Start your very own Victory Garden

Published 4:20 pm Tuesday, May 26, 2020

By Billy Caudle, Currituck Extension

A long time ago, during World War I and World War II, people all over the country planted Victory Gardens in small plots at their homes, unused lots or fields. Everyone pitched in to help feed folks because food was scarce and people wanted to help with the war effort. It was a way of helping your country, your family and your neighborhood – chipping in to do your part. Not only did it produce a lot of food, but it helped morale and gave people a renewed sense of patriotism.

Now we are not in a war, but we are facing a serious threat. Many people are out of work and some things are in short supply because of the pandemic. What a great way to do your part and help out your family, your neighbors and your community by planting a Victory Garden! Most any space can be used to plant something edible and useful. Instead of planting a flower in a pot, why not plant a tomato plant or a pepper plant? Why not turn a little spot into a small garden planted with useful vegetables or fruits that can be used this summer and shared with others? It really does not take that much effort and seeds are readily available.

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I started looking around my yard for a spot for a victory garden and utilized a small space that is less than 100 square feet. It has fairly good sunshine and it will be easy to water and care for throughout the summer. Next, I started thinking about what I would plant in my little garden. I decided upon a few vegetables that would produce over a longer period of time – lettuce, okra, squash and brussels sprouts. The lettuce is a leafy variety and you harvest regularly all the way through fall. All of these choices allow me to harvest over a fairly long season.

I bet you could do the same thing. It would be a great project and provide an opportunity to help others along the way. So today, I challenge you to make your own Victory Garden!

For more information or questions regarding any of the other Currituck County 4-H activities, contact Billy Caudle at 252-232-2262 or billy_caudle@ncsu.edu.

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