• 68°

Nags Head to begin beach renourishment project

In preparation for the 2019 Nags Head beach renourishment project, equipment has been staged at several points around town.

“We will be nourishing essentially the same area we did back in 2011,” said Nags Head public information officer Roberta Thuman. “From the Bonnett Street public beach access at 2919 South Virginia Dare Trail down to the south end of town to the town line with the National Park Service near Mile Post 21.”

Thuman said once everything is in place, Great Lakes Dredge and Dock, the town’s dredging contractor for the project, could start adding sand to the 10 miles of beach as early as May 1.

Great Lakes is the same contractor that Nags Head used in 2011. It is also the same contractor that worked on the Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, Southern Shores and Duck beaches in 2017.

Coastal Science and Engineering is the town’s beach nourishment engineering firm.

A submerged pipe sub-line is already in place near Pelican Street, where the Ellis Island, one of two dredges, will start working. Generally, a hopper dredge draws sand into a large hold and carry it to the submerged pipe. Sand is then pumped onto the shore through the submerged pipe, where bulldozers smooth it out and grade it according to a pre-determined pattern.

After starting in the milepost 20 area, the vessel will then move north.

A second hopper dredge, the Liberty Island, is scheduled to begin work later in May at another submerged sub-line at the north end of town, between Conch Street and Hollowell Street around milepost 11.5, and work its way south.

The plan of action calls for the two to meet someplace in the middle.

Because beach nourishment projects are designed to take advantage of natural forces, about two-thirds of the sand from offshore will be used to create a more stable beach shape, which is more effective in breaker larger waves offshore.

Thuman said this is the first time the Ellis Island has been used here, adding that it is faster than the 2011 dredges.

The project is expected to take between 90 and 120 days. In 2011, work started May 24 with work completed in mid-October with 4.6 million cubic yards of sand added to cover the 10 miles of beach.

This project, with four million cubic yards of sand, is almost as big an undertaking.

Originally scheduled for the 2018 summer, it had to be delayed when the bids came in much higher than expected. The delay, however, may have proved to benefit Nags Head.

“This project,” explained Thuman, “is a combination of the town’s regular re-nourishment and the replacement of sand lost during Hurricane Matthew.”

Using a combination of state and public disaster money, North Carolina will be contributing 25 percent of the cost and to replace sand lost during Matthew, with FEMA pitching in the remaining 75 percent. The remainder of the $43 million project costs are covered through a special tax district with additional money collected from a town-wide tax rate.

Nags Head was able to determine how much sand was lost during Matthew through surveys taken prior to and after the storm.

Thuman said project updates will be available at http://www.nagsheadnc.gov/883/Beach-Nourishment, with links to sign up for beach nourishment updates, or by calling during normal business hours at 252-449-2022.

READ ABOUT MORE NEWS AND EVENTS HERE.

News

Running out of storm names, Atlantic season goes Greek

News

Regional COVID-19 case count update

News

Permit for water treatment system issued for Chemours site

News

Duck Town Council reviews promotions and contracts

News

Mascot name change presentation brought to Dare Board of Education

News

Dare County warns about coastal flooding and NC 12 impact

News

Cape Hatteras Electric Cooperative linemen travel to Alabama to assist with Hurricane Sally damage

Crime

UPDATED: Body found in Virginia believed to be missing North Carolina man, suspect charged

Hyde

NCDOT: Bigfoot Slough dredging tentatively scheduled for next week

News

Cooper: North Carolina can elementary schools move to Plan A in October

News

ARHS reports additional COVID-19 related death in Bertie County

News

Unsettled weather visits Outer Banks

News

Four positive COVID-19 cases reported at Peak Resources

News

Additional COVID-19 related death reported in Pasquotank County

News

NC lieutenant governor: Reopen schools without mask mandate

News

Some North Carolina voters mistakenly get two absentee ballots

Currituck

Currituck County Board of Education names Lutz as superintendent

Lifestyles

Constitution Week begins Thursday

News

Split North Carolina appeals court retains two amendments

Schools

School bus driver class set in Columbia

Crime

Currituck County man sentenced in federal court for illegal gun possession

News

State and local COVID-19 updates

Hyde

Ocracoke Campground season extended through winter 2020-21

News

State relief bill funding comes to various agencies in northeastern North Carolina